Social work majors hosted Democratic primary debate night in hopes that more will be informed and vote in presidential primaries

Social work majors hosted Democratic primary debate night in hopes that more will be informed and vote in presidential primaries

A viewing of the Democratic Primary Debate happened in Chicago Hall loft on February 25th, hosted by the Student Social Work Organization (SSWA). This viewing was an opportunity for North Central students to come together for quality time and to inform themselves about the current Democratic candidates.

“A lot of people are just turning 18 and they don’t know a lot about voting,”  said Jessica Brzezinski, who studies Social Work on campus and is the Vice President of SSWA, “. . .we just think that it is a right for people to be able to vote and choose who leads them that they be more informed with who they are voting for.” 

The debate was casted live in Charleston, South Carolina that evening, a week before the primaries on March 3rd. There were 7  Democratic candidates in the debate, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., former Mayor of New York City Michael R. Bloomberg, former Mayor of the South Bend, Indiana Pete Buttigieg, the Senator of Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren, the Senator of Minnesota Amy Klobuchar, the American philanthropist Tom Steyer, and the Senator of Vermont Bernie Sanders.

The event’s atmosphere was full of energy with students engaging in conversations and enjoying snacks as the debate took place.   

“I want to know more [about] what the candidates are really standing for and what they believe in and kind of just watch [the debate] live verses always reading about and hearing someone else’s perspective on it,” said Francisco Delagarza, who studies Bible and theology at North Central.

Events like this on campus can be a great way to start being more involved and showcases the importance of politics.

 “Politics are important because it’s our means of handing power over to people and everyone should care about that because power is used to shape our society,” said Shelby Buetner, who studies computer science at North Central. 

Also, events like these give students the atmosphere to share their views about politics in a thoughtful way among peers.

“I think we as a university can do a better job of creating spaces to have constructive, positive conversations where we just listen to each other,”  said Professor Mallory Knipe, the Social Work Program Director and advisor of the SSWA, “I think that is where it starts and then it’s the student’s responsibility to take advantage of those opportunities.”

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