Northerner Editorial: Waste of a Wall?

Should a border wall be a priority over a functioning immigration system?

Trump at US-Mexico border with law enforcement officials
Department of Homeland Security and US Border Patrol officials listen to the POTUS explain why walls are important to border security during a visit to see border wall prototypes in San Diego on March 13, 2018. Photo by Ralph Desio, taken from US Department of Defense photo gallery, licensed for public use.

A 35-day partial shutdown of the US government recently ended, with the threat of a new shutdown looming. The deal to end the shutdown and provide funding for the government will only last until Feb. 15, with President Donald Trump saying that he is willing to utilize government funding again as a negotiating tool to build a wall on our southern border. The southern border is nearly 2,000 miles long, and largely covered by natural barriers. The Trump administration has proposed 700 miles of new or updated fortifications, with drones that will secure the remainder of the border. They have estimated this proposal to cost about 18.2 billion dollars over 10 years.

Politicians are engaging in heated debates regarding the border wall in the wake of the 35-day partial shutdown. While some on the left believe the border wall to be inherently immoral, others would say that it’s just an inefficient use of federal resources and tax dollars. Those on the right believe that the border wall is necessary to protect our country and bolster our economy. According to the Pew Research Center, only 29 percent of Americans insist on having funding for the border wall before reopening the government. This leaves more than 70 percent of Americans who are, at best, apathetic to the idea of a border wall. Politicians are engaging in heated debates regarding the border wall in the wake of the 35-day partial shutdown.

After deliberation on the matter the editorial staff of The Northerner largely believes that the border wall is inefficient and a waste of tax dollars. While the majority of undocumented immigrants are arriving over land, 41 percent of illegal immigration occurs due to visa overstays. Brookings Institute estimates the cost of the slat wall to be $5.7 billion dollars, while hardware tests of  a prototype of the same slat model have shown it can be cut by a simple household saw. Most of the editorial board believes that a more efficient use of $5.7 billion wall as well as the 18.2 billion dollars over 10 years would be a restructuring of our current broken immigration system.

According to a study conducted by the White House, border apprehensions have been on the rise for eight years. The current immigration system is putting a “strain on federal resources and burdening American taxpayers” according to the study done by the White House. While more border security is certainly needed to combat the rising amount of entry attempts over land, the border wall is seemingly a patch being applied to a much bigger issue. Therefore, most of us are not in support of an exploitable border wall that may ultimately be a waste taxpayer money while also failing to restructure our current immigration system. The current immigration system is putting a “strain on federal resources and burdening American taxpayers” according to the study done by the White House.

According to the White House, border apprehensions have been on the rise for eight years and comes to the conclusion that our current immigration system is putting a “strain on federal resources and burdening American taxpayers.” While more border security is certainly needed to combat the rising amount of entry attempts over land, the border wall is seemingly a patch being applied to a much bigger issue. Therefore, most of us are not in support of an exploitable border wall that may ultimately be a waste taxpayer money while also failing to restructure our current immigration system.

About the author: Gabriel Wright

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